Briggsy

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Briggsy last won the day on October 20 2015

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About Briggsy

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  1. Thanks for listening and for the feedback mate. Boca - Play With Me is such a tune isn't it? Warped records is the one side to DJ'ing with vinyl that I don't miss. I remember Altitude - Excession being a nightmare to mix because it suddenly jumped up 2bpm which threw the entire mix out. My aim is to have a "retro" mix similar to this online every three months - the next one should be recorded and online within the next couple of weeks hopefully :-D
  2. Hi guys, I've just started a quarterly "retro" Trance & Hardgroove Techno podcast - which will feature approximately 75 minutes of tunes from the mid-1990's through to around 2015. I've just added Episode 1 to Podomatic, SoundCloud and MixCloud if anyone wants to check it out. https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/thebeatlogistixpodcast/episodes/2018-01-14T09_26_32-08_00 https://soundcloud.com/thebeatlogistixpodcast/the-beat-logistix-podcast-episode-1-january-2018 Tracklisting: Megamind - Taub (2002 Mix) [BXR Records - 2002] Umek - Gatex (Oliver Lieb Remix) [Magik Muzik - 2002] Abel Ramos - Aquarius (Randy Katana Mix - CSB Edit) [Pulsar Records - 2004] Divini & Warning - 4LB (Original Mix) [Reset Records - 2006] Adam Sheridan - Terminal Velocity (Original Mix) [Tatsumaki - 2004] Rank 1 - Such Is Life (Deep Dub) [ID&T - 2001] Out Of Grace - Mindblast (Original Mix) [High Contrast Recordings - 2006] DJ Atmospherik Meets Saucermen - Aquarius (DJ Atmospherik Remix) [Offshore Music - 2005] Mojado - Naranja (Dimitri Andreas Vision) [Magik Muzik - 2004] Boca - Play With Me (Bellfire Mix) [Dropout - 2002] Ricky Effe - Rectifier (Original Mix) [BXR Records - 2002] Dick Van Nille - Outside (Original Mix) [Drehscheibe - 2002] Mainx - 88 To Piano (Fabio Stein's Panic Bootleg) [Unreleased / White Label - 2006] Marcel Woods - Cherry Blossom (Original Mix - CSB's 'Energy' Edit) [High Contract Recordings - 2005] Muchas gracias amigos
  3. Hi guys, It's been a while - but I thought i'd post my first mix in years as I no longer DJ - but I was asked to record a guest mix for a good friends 200th "Back From The Dead" 24-hour special radio show on AfterHours.FM which was broadcast yesterday. In keeping with the station's music policy, it's a bit Trancier than I would usually play - and nowhere near as hard as my old clubs sets. Here's the tracklisting: Ad Brown vs Blue Amazon vs DJ Eco - There's No Other Light At The End My Love (Paul Moloney Intro Bootleg)Darren Porter - Culture (Original Mix) GD - Choral Reef (Original Mix) Airwave - Another Dimension (Original Mix) Thomas Bronzwaer - Constellation (John O'Callaghan Remix) Van Faber & De Suza - Overload (Johan Kivi Remix) Mona Lisa Overdrive - Born To Synthesize (Neo & Farina Remix) John O'Callaghan - Psychic Sensor (Indecent Noise Remix)Sean Tyas - Lift (Sean Tyas Rework) Dart Rayne & Yura Moonlight - Silhouette (Allen & Envy Remix) Lost Witness - Happiness Happening (Lange Remix)
  4. New Hi-Gate Music?

    Utter tripe. A bit like that entire mix really. To think this is the same guy that used to blow me away around 1998 - 2006. Oh how the mighty have fallen.
  5. Jules' Classics Set From Luminosity

    Nice tunes - and they actually complimented each other. Shocking mixing though. Loose beats flying about everywhere. Umek - Gatex into Ralph Fridge - Angel was horrific. To be fair though, his following mix was class - Da Hool - Meet Her At The Love Parade into Gatex was superb!
  6. Jules music

    I'd love to hear a "proper Jules classics" set - but unfortunately, I think even that would lead to disappointment now. I remember discussions on here about his last Radio 1 show. All the talk about what we thought he might play. All the tunes that we thought were pretty much guaranteed to be played. Most of us expected some of Jules's most popular tunes from his sets over the years - tunes that most of us would regard as "Jules classics" - tunes such as Green Martian - Industry, DJ Elite - That Fuct Camera, Rockafellas - Da Boss Track, Brainbug - Nightmare (Sinister Strings remix) - yet he played none of them. He played tunes that left many people on here underwhelmed. Tunes that, even at their peak, were fairly average tunes - such as Ferry Corsten - Rock Your Body, Rock. Jules had the opportunity to go out with such an epic, memorable set that night - yet it was very average and underwhelming. After the tens of thousands of tunes Jules has accumulated over the past 25+ years, some of which are huge classics, to hear Marcel Woods - Advanced and Ferry Corsten - Rock Your Body was underwhelming and disappointing to say the least. Even tunes that weren't necessarily what I'd regard as classics, but tunes that were heavily supported by Jules, such as Fabio Stein - Tran-4 and Team SR - Leaving London, were missed out - whilst Sander van Doorn - Riff was played, yet I wouldn't really associate that as being a big Jules tune. Even classics that I thought were almost guaranteed to be played, such as Kristine Blond - Love Shy, Brainbug - Nightmare and Starparty - I'm In Love (Ferry Corsten & Robert Smit Remix) - which Jules has stated as being amongst he's favourite ever tunes in interviews on many occasions - were overlooked. Puzzling and disappointing summed up that last Radio 1 show for me. There were many others on here that night that felt the same way. As for the media, Jules was never really respected by many the DJ press anyway to be fair. Jules just wasn't really "cool" enough for them. Mixmag, DJ Mag, etc loved the "cool" DJ's like Hawtin, Sasha, Carl Cox, etc. Jules's unique but "loud" clothing and custom-made unusual specs image - in addition to the playful interaction with the crowd, gestures, poses & daft faces with in the booth - along with sometimes occasional commercial or cheesy tunes, gimmicky scratches and a "celebrity" profile, divided opinion. Jules was loved by many. Jules was also frowned upon by many. He got a lot of undeserved flack simply because he wasn't seen as "cool" enough. Jules did change his sound slightly in the late 90's to early 2000's - but he always had an "identity". A sound that everyone recognized. When he reduced the amount of bouncy / funky Euro house, he played more Trance that had bouncy / funky basslines. Even when Trance peaked in 1998/1999 with the melodic "big riff" sound that became really popular (tunes like Ferry's remix of Adagio For Strings, Energy 52 - Cafe Del Mar, all the Signum and X-Cabs style stuff for example), Jules's didn't really play a great deal of it - he was playing more of the bouncier / funkier tunes such as The Act - Something About You, Burgy - Lochfrab, Moogwai - Viola, etc - followed by all the Hi-Gate, Yomanda, Storm - Storm, Zombie Nation stuff a few years later. Jules was never really an out-and-out Trance DJ - he just tended to play anything that had funky or bouncy basslines. He just happened to play more Trance than any other genres in his sets. He had an "identity" and sound that everyone recognised - Jules was one of very few DJ's where you could walk into a club, and know that Jules was playing, before even seeing him, simply by hearing the tunes that were playing. From 2005/2006 onwards, that "identity" and sound was lost completely - for the first time in his career. He was just playing anything that was popular at the time. Never in Jules's career prior to the Trouse / EDM phase had Jules ever played anything like that in his sets before. I was a complete change. So whilst I agree that Jules's sound slightly over time, his "identity" / style always remained the same in his sets - funky/ bouncy tunes with a few complimenting Trancey tunes. To an extent, that change was a natural change as dance music progressed and changed a little over the years. During 2006 onwards though, it wasn't a natural change. Jules just suddenly started playing slow, Trouse and "EDM" - which he didn't need to do because there was still plenty of the pacier, bouncier, more Trancier tunes around. It was a change he appeared to choose - rather than one that came about as a natural progression as a genre changed.
  7. Jules music

    I suspect that Jules knows, and has accepted, that he's no longer looked upon as a credible Trance music DJ. I suspect that he's also quite content playing the kind of music and the more mainstream clubs these days because it's enabled him to prolong his career alongside a day job. The UK Trance scene is on its arse now - so gigs in this country have really dried up - and all of the big British DJs are now having to play abroad a lot lot more - to the point where I see the likes of Halliwell, Emery, Above & Beyond, etc on more European, Australian and South American line-ups than UK line-ups now. Jules was at his peak in the mid 90's to late 90's through to around 2004/2005. After that, rather than having the "niche" sound he'd always had (Pacey, Harder-edged Tech-Trance, Trance with funky basslines and House with a Euro bounce to it - plus the occasional outrageous quirky tune that couldn't be categorised into any style or genre - but when you walked into a club, you could just tell it was a "Jules Tune"), he started "following trends" - playing anything that was popular at the time. In recent years, Jules has gone from Trance, through to Tech-Trance, through to House, through to "Trouse" through to EDM and commercial nonsense. He always mixed genres to some extent - but Jules always had his own unique sound that could be easily identified - whereas in the end, he was playing whatever sound was popular. Add into that the sloppy beatmatching, clashing tune selection, god awful bootlegs, OTT unnecessary looping and dragging out of breakdowns, "Somebody screaammmmmmm" voiceovers and attempts at scratching that should only be attempted at home when practicing new tricks, its sad just how quickly Jules went down hill. Even just ten years ago, Jules was my favourite DJ. Even now I get out old Jules sets to listen to - and loved them more than any other DJ's sets I listen to because when Jules was at his best, he really was superb. Every time I went out clubbing, Jules made the night. In just a short space of time, that rapidly changed - to the point where whenever I went out, I never knew which Jules I'd get because he became so inconsistent. I remember seeing him one week in London - and he played one of the best sets I'd ever heard - one week later, he played one of the worst I'd ever heard. It was like hearing two completely different DJs because the difference was so vast between the two sets. Then when those "Somebody screammmmmmm" jingles and god awful bootlegs with RNB or pop vocals, poorly mashed-up into a poor tune, I'd just given up completely - and stopped going to see Jules completely. I don't know whether Jules had just lost interest, become out of touch with the Trance scene, became complacent thinking "I've made it" and "I can do as I like - and people will still see me", whether mainstream music that paid better money became more important than playing "niche" music that he loved, or whether he just naturally went into decline as some of the older DJs did - such as John Kelly, Seb Fontaine, etc. That being said though, Carl Cox has been around for donkeys years - and is now 53 years of age - yet even now, he's still relevant to the scene, he's still current, he's still one of the most in demand DJs in the world - and he's still as good and still as passionate as ever - so I don't think that age can result in a decline that quickly if the heart is still in it. It's a shame Jules didn't go out on a high in 2005 - because then I'd have always regarded him as one of my all time favourite DJs and a true legend of the scene. Those last few years have really tarnished that view for me. I'll never ever forget Jules at his best - but unfortunately, it's going to be difficult to forget those bad few years too, sadly, for all the wrong reasons. May sound harsh - but I'm being honest about how I feel.
  8. Jules music

    Jules's style has progressively got slower, cheesier and less focused towards Trance over the last decade - to the point where the bulk of his sets became "EDM" shite and commercial rubbish. He's been irrelevant to the Trance scene for years now unfortunately. His sound is more suited to the "three shots for a fiver" music-for-the-masses commercial / chain-owned clubs these days where 18-25 year olds are happy to hear commercial music with "Somebody screeeeeeeam" jingles slapped over the top. Gone are the days of Jules smashing out a bit of decent, pacey, "niche" tunes like Dark Monks - Insane, BK - Revolution and Mauro Picotto - Baguette at 143bpm in a main room or festival. A 133bpm Swedish House Mafia vs Bananarama vs Will.I.Am vs John McEnroe (Six Sambucas & A Strongbow "You Cannot Be Serious" Vocal Bootleg) mash-up is more apt these days*. *That bootleg may or may not be fictional before anyone tries looking for it*
  9. sexy clubbing costumes

    I think the third one is more you mate
  10. sexy clubbing costumes

    I don't think the blue one will fit me.
  11. Which method of mixing do you prefer - vinyl, CD, MP3?

    Modern software / laptops doesn't necessarily mean that they're going to make everyone amazing DJ's. Eddie Halliwell was amazing when he used vinyl and CD's. When he switched to laptop DJ'ing, it seemed to hinder him. His sets lost spark. I'll never work out why someone with Eddie's talent went down the laptop route. It baffles me. Adam Sheridan used to be good years ago - then he became bland and boring when he switched to laptop DJ'ing - to the point where he's vanished off the radar these days. PvD has gone backwards since moving to laptops too. Laptops also didn't make DJ'ing easier for everyone. It started way before that - as soon as the Pioneer CDJs came out. You can beatmatch on those without needing headphones. Match the beat counters up - voila. I've ever seen DJ's turn up with all their tracks pre-saved to a certain BPM so that the pitch fader is in the same place for every tune (and therefore, they don't need to beatmatch at all). I've nothing against that - there's more to DJ'ing than beatmatching. The biggest art of DJ'ing is finding tunes that complimenting each other and building a set. Just because two tracks are at 142.0bpm, it doesn't mean they're going to mix perfectly into each other. All it's resulted in is an over-saturated scene where everyone is a DJ - which then resulted in DJ's getting booked based on how many mates they could take along with them or how many favours they could do for the promotor. Some awful DJ's were getting big gigs - and some superb DJ's couldn't get a booking at all. You've got to be a ticket salesman or producer now to stand out. Being an amazing DJ doesn't guarantee you a gig. You've got to be profitable to the promoter. Anyway, thats for another topic........ as mentioned above, I've used all formats over the years - and all have their pro's and cons. Vinyl was great - but it was a pain in the arse lugging 50 tunes to a gig and frustrating being limited to just 50 tunes. CDJ's made things semi-automatic, which made some aspects quicker - plus it started to allow the opportunity to add a bit more to sets (loops, hot cues, etc). Laptops allow me to carry my entire 16 year tune collection with me - all accessible within seconds, it allowed me to add some trickery to my sets - and its allowed me to DJ for a bit longer at home because my ears aren't up to beatmatching out in clubs regularly any more. Its also a myth that people only have to hit a "sync" button to beatmatch. Yes, it helps. Yes, it makes life easier - but if people cannot beatmatch, they can still get caught out on a laptop. There's nothing more accurate than the human ear. I've known Traktor's counter to be out by an entire beat. If you can't beatmatch, there's no way of recovering from that in a club. In situations like that, you've got to be able to correct it yourself. Traktor hates some tunes and refuses to play ball at all - for example, try hitting the sync button with Timmy & Tommy - Full Tiltin' and listen to watch happens. It won't be beatmatched even remotely close - and it'll sync to the off-beat (making it half a beat out of sync). So if anyone goes to a gig armed with a laptop thinking they're in for an easy ride - they're not. 9 tunes out of ten will be beatmatched perfectly - and 1 will be so far out of sync, they won't be able to recover from it (and the dancefloor will stop dead!). Just ask Mr M.O.R.P.H ;-)
  12. Clubbed 2002

    It could be a promo mix that was sent out to promote the album launch a while before it was officially released. I used to run a Trance forum years ago, and I used to get a lot of freebies and promos through for reviewing. Quite often, some of those would be mix CD's that are changed a later date. The reason why those changes happen, from what I was told years ago, is that when DJ's want to create a mix album for release, they have to write to each label for permission to use tracks. Although only 30 or so tracks may be used, 50 or so actually get clearance. Quite often, A DJ will want to feature a specific tune - but doesn't get clearance until the very last minute - and as the promos need to go out a month or two in advance, they can sometimes have different tunes to replace those that haven't bene given clearance at the time of the promos going out. That could be the case with this album - but I'm only guessing.
  13. Which method of mixing do you prefer - vinyl, CD, MP3?

    Tricky one for me. I've used all methods - and like them all for different reasons. I loved Vinyl because it was completely manual and all "hands on" - no cue buttons, no digital screens, and, best of all, your sets could have a bit of exclusivety about them if you managed to get your hands on one of a limited number of pre-release promos or 1 of only 50 records pressed in the world, etc. These days, everyone has got access to the same tunes at the same time. I liked CDJ's because they had features that you couldn't have on vinyl decks - looping, etc. Plus, once you were beatmatched, they remained beatmatched. You didn't have to keep faffing about waiting for the inevitable wow/flutter drift. It was also great being able to download tunes for £1.20 instead of £8 each. These days, I use Traktor - just for having the occasional mix at home now that I've quit DJ'ing on a regular basis. Traktor is fantastic. Its only limit is your imagination. You can pretty much remix a track live. If I were to use it to DJ out too, I can take my entire music collection with me - rather than being limited to a bag of 50 vinyl or 300 CD's. More importantly, from my point of view now that my ears are shot and it takes 6 minutes to beatmatch on CDJ's these days, it allows me to beatmatch in seconds again -- alowing me to focus on what I'm doing rather than pissing about wasting 95% of my set time beatmatching - as happened in May when I stupidly did a gig out again. Beatmatching is a big problem for me these days with me ears - so Traktor has, effectively, allowed me to continue DJ'ing for a bit longer than I originally intended. I guess if I had to pick one from the three, then I guess it's vinyl - simply for tradition, exclusively and the "fun" element. Part of the fun of DJ'ing on vinyl was actually going to a record store, buying records, talking to people, and finding rare, obscure, amazing tunes on foreign or minor labels that had gone pretty much unnoticed. With the exception of the price advantage, MP3 "shopping" was a bit dull really.
  14. Sadly, I never saw Jules in his "prime" - I didn't see him out in clubs until quite late, when bads sets were more common than good sets, although I'd been listening to his sets from the late 90's. Can't remember all the times I saw him play - but BCM in 2005 was a real highlight. Probably the 2nd best set I'd ever heard Jules do. Started Funky - and finished more Trancey. Quality set all the way through. Absolutely loved it. Saw him about 3 months after that in Godskitchen and he was horrific. Another highlight was his first set at Global Gathering in 2006 (he played two that day - a 6pm Radio 1 broadcast - plus a late/early 4am set too). Absolutely loved his first set. Pretty full on from start to finish - and I don't know how many of you have ever experienced, but the atmosphere when Jules comes on 5 minutes before his set to announce the tent will be broadcast live on Radio 1 is something else. The whole tent roars as soon as they know its going out live on air. His second set that day was awful again and generally clumsy - mixing Team SR - Leaving London, into Team SR - Leaving London. It's really baffling how Jules could be so good one day, and really bad the next. Even on that day at Global Gathering, it was hard to believe it was the same DJ playing. The difference between the first set and second set was madness - one really good, one really bad. Very odd. Sadly, from then on, whenever I saw Jules, he was awful - with one exception around 2010 when I saw him play a late set at the Ministry Of Sound - and he played a fairly banging set with a lot of old BXR-label sounding stuff - which was really unexpected because by this time, Jules's sets had become much slower and cheesey. Would have loved to have seen Jules around 1999-2003 time. All of the sets i've got of his from that time were amazing. Sadly, I lost faith around 2008/2009 - and the final straw came in August 2009 when I saw him in BCM. My ears couldn't take the dodgy "scratching" and "Somebody Screeeeeeeam" voiceovers any more. Eddie Halliwell took Jules's crown as my favourite DJ from then on (who subsequently turned crap a couple of years after that too).
  15. Pioneer To Launch Turntable

    We're pretty much there anyway. SInce the CDJ-2000's came out, most DJ's have switched from CD to USB memory stick. The day is fast approaching where we'll be DJ'ing wirelessly - playing music from our phones via a wireless connection, or from our webspace "in the cloud". All DJ's will turn up to gigs with is their headphones.